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Is a DUI a Felony?

How Long Does a DUI Stay on a Driver’s License?

How Long Does a DUI Stay on a Driver's License?

After a conviction of a DUI arrest, one of the immediate consequences to be expected is to have driving privileges suspended. The amount of time in which a driver’s license is suspended will depend on various factors, such as the blood alcohol content level and whether this particular instance is a first offense. However, regardless of the term in which a license is suspended, a DUI on a driver’s license record will also have further ramifications. 
How long DUI on driver’s license stays on record may vary depending on the state laws and statutes. States will prove to have different legislation in regard to a DUI on a driver’s license record. Generally speaking, a DUI on a driver’s license record will stay on file for a period of ten years. 
This record can have several consequences of its own, for the ten year period itself acts a probationary period. During this time, any subsequent DUI charge will incur more severe penalties. Furthermore, a DUI on a driver’s license may also have an impact auto insurance as well, affecting insurance rates and even the ability to be insured by certain companies. It is important to be aware of the state’s stance regarding a DUI on a driver’s license, for they will vary. For example, in the state of Alaska, a DUI on a driver’s license will remain on record forever. 

Is a DUI Considered to be a Felony?

Is a DUI Considered to be a Felony?

When facing DUI charges, one of the most important aspects to consider will be whether the DUI charge is considered to be a felony or misdemeanor. Most states will have both felony DUI and misdemeanor DUI charges, though the DUI in the felony category is much more serious and will incur more severe penalties.
Driving while intoxicated will prove to have serious ramifications if arrested and charged for such a violation. However, when a DUI is a felony, the consequences of being charged as such are more detrimental. There are various cases in which a DUI is considered to be felony crime. In certain states, the blood alcohol content that an individual has may play a role as to how the DUI is charged. In such case, a felony DUI may be levied if the BAC is double the legal limit. 
A DUI is a felony charge in the United States when the person driving while intoxicated harms or kills another individual. The resulting DUI is a felony, and will usually be either a DUI manslaughter charge, or DUI murder charge, depending on the intention of the driver as seen by the court of law. 
A DUI is a felony charge in many states in the case that a previous record with driving while intoxicated exists. Subsequent offenders will face more severe charges, though a felony may be levied against a person that has been found guilty of driving while intoxicated more than twice. 

How Does a DUI Affect Car Insurance Rates?

How Does a DUI Affect Car Insurance Rates?

A DUI charge is notoriously known for incurring some expensive fines that are imposed from the court. However, the expenses in regards to a DUI charge will not end there. One aspect that is sometimes overseen by many that have been convicted of DUI is that insurance rates will be affected as a result. DUI and car insurance rates will prove to aspects that do not work very well together in the eyes of insurance companies. Insurance rates will undoubtedly be increased as a result of a DUI charge.
DUI and auto insurance can prove to be a very frustrating situation. The first thing that will occur is that after a DUI conviction, the auto insurance company will be notified, and thus, a person will be labeled as a “high risk driver.” This label essentially allows insurance companies to increase rates because under such a classification, a driver is more susceptible to be involved in an accident or incur costs to the insurance company. 
In many cases, higher insurance rates may be the desirable outcome, for DUI and car insurance will sometimes lead to the company canceling an insurance policy as a result of a DUI conviction. Furthermore, DUI and auto insurance can prove to be more like oil and water, for many insurance companies will simply not provide coverage to a person that has been convicted of DUI charge. This may entail an intensive search for high risk insurance companies that specialize in providing coverage to such drivers. However, insurance rates and premiums should be expected to be at least twice, if not three times, as high as before the DUI conviction. 

DUI vs. DWI?

DUI vs. DWI?

One the most commonly asked questions in regards to drinking and driving is the difference between a DUI and a DWI. Both are acronyms that refer to the operation of a motor vehicle while under the influence of alcohol and/or drugs. DUI stands for Driving Under the Influence, while DWI is an acronym for Driving While Intoxicated. The terms are usually interchanged on a colloquial level, which further adds to the confusion as to their legal significance or meaning.
Because various states will have different traffic laws, many states will actually have a variation between what DUI and DWI mean in legal applications. In such a case, a DUI charge is usually considered to be the lesser charge between the two. Many states will use the DUI charge as way to indicate a lesser level of intoxication. 
However, the determination as to what constitutes as a DUI and Driving While Intoxicated in relationship to the reported blood alcohol content levels may vary from state to state. In the state of New York, for example, a DWI charge is levied against person that has produced a 0.08% BAC reading. Readings of 0.07% and lower may be given a DUI charge instead. However, other states may have zero tolerance policies, in which case, the difference between DUI and DWI is moot, and there is no difference among the two. Therefore, it is important to check with the appropriate state laws in order to determine if there are any differences applied to the two terms. 

Find The Answers to Your DUI Questions

Find The Answers to Your DUI Questions


DUI vs DWI

There seems to be an inherent confusion between the terms DUI and DWI, for they are often used interchangeably by many. However, certain jurisdictions will place a quantifiable difference between the two, where a DUI conviction means that the intoxication level was less than 0.08% in accordance to the Breathalyzer test. 


How Does a DUI Affect Car Insurance Rates?
Generally speaking, a DUI conviction is bound to have a negative impact when it comes to car insurance rates. However, how severe this impact may be will depend on several aspects. An increase in insurance rates and premiums should be expected, though many companies may go as far as dropping a person’s insurance policy. 
Is a DUI Considered to be a Felony?

A DUI conviction can be rendered as either a misdemeanor or a felony crime in the United States. Certain factors will be considered when levying a DUI felony conviction, which may be existing DUI record, harm to another human being, and the recorded BAC level of the individual. 
How Long Does a DUI Stay on a Driver’s License?

Depending on the jurisdiction, a DUI can remain on a license for an undefined amount of time. In the United States, however, the general rule regarding DUI convictions on a driving record will remain in place for ten years. However, this will vary from state from state, for there are some in which the DUI will remain on the record forever.