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State DUI Laws

Arkansas DUI Laws

Alaska DUI Laws

Arizona DUI Laws

Arizona DUI Laws

Arizona DUI laws follow that of many states in its recognition of 0.08 percent as a basis of prohibition from operating any motor vehicles. In such a case, it would be advised that the individual be swift in acquiring the counsel of an Arizona DUI lawyer. Arizona DUI laws set forth the following qualifications for illegality in terms of alcohol consumption and vehicular operation. 
They include: any concoction of alcohol, drugs, or “vapor-releasing substances,” such as lead to the impairment of the driver, a blood alcohol level of 0.08 percent or more following two hours on the road, 0.04 percent or more for “commercial motor vehicle operators,” and any amount whatsoever of alcohol within a driver’s system who is under the age of 21. Any charges brought against individuals for Arizona DUI will encompass that of a “misdemeanor criminal conviction.” Therefore, it cannot be stressed enough how imperative it is to hire an adequate Arizona DUI lawyer. 
Arizona DUI laws possess specifications for three offenses, that which comprise the first offense, its repetition, and a third repeat. The Arizona DUI base fine is that of $250 with additional DUI as well as probation surcharges of $200 and $10 each. IN addition, the individual will be expected to pay additional hefty fines of $500 each for “prison construction assessment” as well as “Arizona Xtra DUI Assessment.” 
In terms of jail time, a minimum amount of one day to ten days may be expected in addition to license suspension ranging from ninety to three hundred and sixty days. The court may also order the offender to install an “ignition interlock device” at the driver’s expense. For the first repeat Arizona DUI offense, the base fine is that of $500 with surcharges of $400 and $10. In terms of the additional assessment costs, they incur $1,250 each. Imprisonment ranges from a minimum time of thirty days to that of ninety days. In addition, offenders will be expected to complete a minimum of thirty days of “community restitution.”
License suspension will last that of one whole calendar year in addition to the court-ordered installation of an ignition interlock device as well. Individuals will also be expected to complete alcohol or additional “drug screening” as well as “educational or treatment programs.” In terms of the second repeat Arizona DUI offense, the base fine is that of $750 while surcharges will run you in the amounts of $600 and $10 each. 
Assessment charges will ask even more of you as you will be expected to pay up $1,500 each in addition to a “DUI Abatement Fee” of $250. In terms of jail time, the minimum amount will be that of four months, in which case you will want to acquire an Arizona DUI lawyer in order to ensure that number does not become inflated. License suspension will last up till a year with the court ordering the ignition device as well. One will also need to complete the programs already stated in terms of the second Arizona DUI offense.
In contrast to other states, Arizona also possesses additional “Extreme Drunk Driving Convictions” for its state. Under the classification of “extreme DUI,” an individual will possess a blood alcohol level of 0.15 percent of more within two hours of being on the road. Fines will usually be in the thousands with licenses being revoked for year in most cases. The installment of an ignition device is also necessary. 

Alabama DUI Laws

Alabama DUI Laws

In general, Alabama DUI laws set forth that it is illegal to operate a motor vehicle if any of the following qualifications exist. These include driving under the influence of alcohol/drugs, whose blood alcohol level is 0.08 percent of more, a “commercial vehicle operator” whose blood alcohol level is 0.04 percent of more, and a blood alcohol level of 0.02 percent for individuals under the age of 21 or who work as school bus of daycare drivers. Alabama DUI laws also set forth an “implied consent law.”
This law specifies that all persons who operate motor vehicles be assumed to have given forth their consent to a “chemical test or examinations of blood, breath, or urine,” all with the express purpose of determining one’s blood alcohol level. Alabama DUI laws state that any refusal to take part in such tests will result in immediate license suspension.
Alabama DUI laws set forth specifications for up to four-time offenders, after which increasingly serious penalties are assumed to be imposed. For a first time Alabama DUI offender, the individual may expect jail time that may last up to one whole year, fines ranging from $600 to about $2,000 or the combination of the two, as well as license suspension for up to ninety days in total. A second Alabama DUI may incur imprisonment of up to one year, as well, in addition to a “mandatory minimum” amount of five days, or a minimum of thirty days of community service.
Fines for a second time Alabama DUI range from that of $1,100 to $5,100 as well as license suspension for an entire calendar year. A third Alabama DUI offense is comprised of jail-time from 60 days to a year, with 60 days being the mandatory minimum amount. Fines are even higher for such an offense as they range from $2,100 to $10,000 as well as incur a license suspension in the upwards of three years.
The fourth time offender has even more to worry over as such an offense is labeled as a “Class ‘C’ Felony” according to Alabama DUI laws. In such a case, imprisonment may range from a year to ten years, with a year and a day being the mandatory minimum amount. The fines for such an offense also range from greater amounts, such as that of $4,100 to as much as $10,100. In addition, they must complete a state certified chemical dependency program, as well as have their license suspended for five years.
Alabama DUI laws set forth that any convicted DUI offender within the state complete a “DUI or substance abuse court referral program.” Such laws are deemed necessary to demonstrate the seriousness of such offenses. In addition, the state of Alabama hopes to deter individuals from attempting such dangerous practices in the future.
Aside from calculators and charts that some may use to determine their blood alcohol level, authorities suggest that driving should not occur at all if any amount of alcohol is consumed, as will be the safest option for all.

Missouri DUI Laws

Missouri DUI Laws

Mississippi DUI laws, although not as strict as some other states, carries stiff penalties and fines. In addition, an individual charged with a Mississippi DUI could face potential jail time and receive a lengthy license suspension. Mississippi, in accordance with the rest of the American states, maintains a .08 allowable BAC with stricter limits for commercial drivers and those under the age of twenty-one. 
The allowable BAC for a commercial driver and one under the age of twenty-one is .04 and .02 respectively. Also, Mississippi DUI laws include implied consent for a drug and alcohol screen that carries penalties if a driver refuses and the police officer holds reasonable suspicion that they are under the influence of not only alcohol but drugs as well. 
A first Mississippi DUI offense can result in jail-time of up to forty-eight hours, a fine of two-hundred and fifty to one-thousand dollars, and a suspended license for ninety days (with a hardship claim permitted after 30). Other penalties can include the completion of an alcohol program and the mandatory attendance of a victim impact panel. 
Mississippi DUI laws increase in severity with the second charge. The possible penalties for a second Mississippi DUI include; jail-time for five days up to one year, a fine from between six-hundred and one-thousand five-hundred dollars, and a suspended license for two years. 
Also, the second Mississippi DUI charge can include community service for ten days up to one year. Mississippi DUI laws also allow for other possible consequences, of which include; the installment of an ignition interlock device, the immobilization or impounding of all vehicles registered by the charged driver, the completion of an alcohol education program, and the attendance of the victim impact panel.
The third Mississippi DUI charge carries jail for one to five years, a fine for two-thousand to five-thousand dollars, and a suspended license for five years. Other possible penalties include having an ignition interlock installed, the forfeiture of vehicle or even all vehicles registered to that owner, and the completion of alcohol safety and victim impact panel. 

Montana DUI Laws

Montana DUI Laws

Montana DUI laws are similar to the majority of states. Registering anything above a .08 will result in a DUI charge, and unlike other states, even an amount as low as .04 can count under Montana DUI laws in conjunction with other mitigating factors. A Montana DUI charge carries strict penalties and will often require the services of a trained attorney to at least fight for the lower scale punishment. 
Montana DUI laws provide an implied consent clause that means anytime it is suspected a driver is under the influence, they are required to provide a sample of blood, urine, or breath to be analyzed. If this is refused, it correlates to an automatic six month license suspension. Drivers under the age of twenty-one receive zero-tolerance and if they register any amount of alcohol they are charged with a DUI. Also, commercial drivers are held to .04 allowable BAC. 
First Offense:
A first Montana DUI offense can result in a jail period of twenty-four hours up to six months, and this is doubled if the driver is charged with a DUI while transporting an individual under the age of sixteen. The driver is also subjected to fines of three hundred to one-thousand dollars, and six-hundred to two-thousand if transporting someone sixteen or under. Receiving a Montana DUI will likely correlate to a six month license suspension with a possible interlock device and/or issuance of a restricted license. Also, Montana DUI laws call for the completion of a driver-alcohol and substance education program.
Second Offense:
Understandably, the punishments increase after a second Montana DUI charge. These penalties can include; jail from seven to one-hundred eighty days (doubles if with minor sixteen or younger, fines from six-hundred to one-thousand dollars (double if with minor sixteen or younger), and a one-year suspension of driving privileges. A probationary-based license can be made available after 45 days full suspension if the driver agrees to pay the cost of installing and maintaining an interlock device. If the driver opts not to, they may have to forfeit their vehicle.
Third Offense: 

Being charged for a third Montana DUI will result in a minimum jail sentence of thirty days and up to one year. Fines will range from one-thousand to five-thousand dollars. Both of these charges double if with minor under the age of sixteen. The license suspension plan is the same as the second charge under Montana DUI laws.

Nebraska DUI Laws

Nebraska DUI Laws

Nebraska DUI laws levy strict penalties for those caught driving with a BAC of .08 or above. These limits are lower for commercial drivers and those under the age of twenty-one; .04 and .02 respectively. Being charged with a Nebraska DUI that surpasses .15 BAC will result in even stricter penalties that can double sentences and fees. Nebraska law on DUI also provide for the prosecution of those found with any trace of controlled substances in their screening, and in conjunction with other charges, can result in a DUI charge. Many consider hiring a Nebraska DUI attorney to fight for the lowest possible end of the following penalties. 

First Offense:

A first Nebraska DUI charge can result in a minimum of seven days upwards to one-hundred and eighty, in addition to a suspended license for a mandated minimum of six months. If the driver was found to have a BAC higher than .15, they can have their license suspended for one year. In addition, the court may issue an assessment and possible treatment for alcohol or drug related problems, permitted under Nebraska DUI laws.

Second Offense:

Being charged with a second Nebraska DUI carries a mandatory minimum jail sentence of thirty days and up to ninety days. This minimum rises to ninety days up to a possible one-hundred and eighty if the driver is charges with a BAC at or above .15. Fines for a second Nebraska DUI can be up to five-hundred dollars and one-thousand if at or above .15 BAC. The charged driver will also have a license suspended for one year (double if at or above .15), an immobilized vehicle for five to two-hundred forty days, and a possible impounding or ignition interlock. Nebraska DUI laws also provide for the assessment and treatment of possible problems for the second charge. 

Third Offense:

Receiving a third Nebraska DUI charge could result in jail time from ninety days up to one year (minimum of one-hundred eighty and up to five years if at or above .15), a fine of up to six-hundred dollars (up to ten-thousand if at or above .15), a suspension of driving privileges for two to fifteen years (five to fifteen if .15 or above), possible immobilization of vehicle, and/or the installation of an interlock device. Again, the court will assess if treatment may be needed.

Fourth Offense:

Unlike the majority of states, Nebraska provides for a fourth and fifth tier offense for a DUI. A fourth Nebraska DUI results in a felony and can carry with it a minimum jail sentence of one-hundred eighty days up to five years (one to twenty years if .15 BAC or above), a fine up to ten-thousand dollars (up to twenty-five thousand if .15 or above), a suspension of driving privileges for fifteen years, and the same aforementioned possible interlock, immobilization, and assessment.

Fifth Offense: Nebraska DUI laws provide a fifth charge of a felony that includes; a one year minimum jail sentence (one to fifty for .15 BAC or above), fine up to twenty-five thousand dollars, and a suspension of diving privileges for fifteen years. 

Wisconsin DUI Laws

Wisconsin DUI Laws

Wisconsin DUI laws are not as strict as many other states. Under Wisconsin DUI laws, any individual who has a minor in the vehicle at the time of the Wisconsin DUI arrest will have their punishments doubled to include extra jail time and fines. In Wisconsin, a minor is anyone under the age of 16 years old. 
The first time one is convicted of a Wisconsin DUI, they are subject to a license suspension of at least six months. A fine of $300 will be imposed on the individual charged with a Wisconsin DUI. There is no possible jail time for an individual who is charged with their first Wisconsin DUI. Again, if there is a minor in the vehicle at the time of the incident, the fine and suspension period for the driver’s license is doubled. Proof of financial responsibility is also required.
A second Wisconsin DUI is punishable by a jail term of five to 60 days. Wisconsin DUI laws require an individual’s license to be suspended for at least one year. Possible fines for a second Wisconsin DUI charge range from $350 to $1100 depending on the severity. 
If a minor under the age of 16 was in the vehicle at the time of arrest, an additional fine of $355 may be added to the original fine. After a second Wisconsin DUI conviction, the individual may have to install an ignition interlock device in any car they own or drive on a regular basis.
A third Wisconsin DUI charge can carry a fine of $600 to $2000. An individual’s driver’s license will be suspended for at least a year under Wisconsin DUI laws. A jail sentence of 30 days to one year is possible as well. An individual’s car also may be seized or forfeited, depending on the circumstances of the Wisconsin DUI arrest. 
In Wisconsin, there are also rules following a fourth, fifth and sixth DUI conviction. While the fines do get higher, the license suspension penalty does not change all that much. A sixth Wisconsin DWI carries a penalty of two to three years license revocation.
An individual is always eligible, under Wisconsin DUI laws, to file for a conditional license after a certain period of time. Even after a sixth Wisconsin DUI conviction, that time period is only 90 days. Individuals are also subject to alcohol and drug assessments and rehabilitation programs.
 
 

Idaho DUI Laws

Idaho DUI Laws

 

Idaho DUI laws call for a mix of jail time, fines and programs to punish and even help offenders. While you may spend 6 months in jail after 1 Idaho DUI, there is a chance you are forced into alcohol rehabilitation treatment. A 2nd Idaho DUI offense and there is a work detail program with the county sheriff. Treatment is likely necessary as well as an ignition interlock device to prevent you from committing another Idaho DUI. 

Idaho DUI laws restrict a driver from driving with a blood alcohol content of .08 or more. A commercial vehicle driver must stay below .04 and drivers who are under the legal drinking age will be charged with a DUI if they are at .02 or more. Young people need to realize that it does not take more than a beer or two to reach the .02 level. It does not matter how sober you feel, if you are caught drinking any amount and are under 21 then that is illegal and if it is put together with driving there will be harsh penalties under Idaho law on DUI. 

First Offense: 

One Idaho DUI can land you in jail for up to 6 months. The guilty person can be charged a $1,000 fine. Idaho DUI laws have the right to suspend your license for 180 days and may order you to drive with a restricted license for 30 days following the suspension. It is also possible the court orders you to undergo alcohol evaluation and treatment. 

Second Offense:

Receive a second Idaho DUI you may be subject to a minimum of 10 days in jail with the possibility of serving up to 1 year. It is after the 2nd offense that the court may order the guilty person to enter a sheriff's work detail program. This is an alternate method to punishing for DUIs for those that do not respond to possible jail terms. Idaho also enforces an ignition interlock device which serves to protect the public from chronic drunk drivers. The ignition interlock device is an example of a Idaho DUI law that is a great tool for monitoring past Idaho DUI offenders that does not require surveillance from an actual person. 

Third Offense: 

The Idaho DUI laws for the third offense are also true for all future Idaho DUI violations. It is a felony charge that carries a sentence  of 5 days, up to 5 years. There is a fine up to $5,000 and a license suspension ranging from 1-5 years. If the offender is allowed to drive again they must use an ignition interlock device. The offender may also undergo possible alcohol evaluation and treatment. 

Mississippi DUI Laws

Mississippi DUI Laws

Mississippi DUI laws, although not as strict as some other states, carries stiff penalties and fines. In addition, an individual charged with a Mississippi DUI could face potential jail time and receive a lengthy license suspension. Mississippi, in accordance with the rest of the American states, maintains a .08 allowable BAC with stricter limits for commercial drivers and those under the age of twenty-one. 

The allowable BAC for a commercial driver and one under the age of twenty-one is .04 and .02 respectively. Also, Mississippi law on DUI include implied consent for a drug and alcohol screen that carries penalties if a driver refuses and the police officer holds reasonable suspicion that they are under the influence of not only alcohol but drugs as well. 

A first Mississippi DUI offense can result in jail-time of up to forty-eight hours, a fine of two-hundred and fifty to one-thousand dollars, and a suspended license for ninety days (with a hardship claim permitted after 30). Other penalties can include the completion of an alcohol program and the mandatory attendance of a victim impact panel. 

Mississippi DUI laws increase in severity with the second charge. The possible penalties for a second Mississippi DUI include; jail-time for five days up to one year, a fine from between six-hundred and one-thousand five-hundred dollars, and a suspended license for two years.

Also, the second Mississippi DUI charge can include community service for ten days up to one year. Mississippi DUI laws also allow for other possible consequences, of which include; the installment of an ignition interlock device, the immobilization or impounding of all vehicles registered by the charged driver, the completion of an alcohol education program, and the attendance of the victim impact panel.

The third Mississippi DUI charge carries jail for one to five years, a fine for two-thousand to five-thousand dollars, and a suspended license for five years. Other possible penalties include having an ignition interlock installed, the forfeiture of vehicle or even all vehicles registered to that owner, and the completion of alcohol safety and victim impact panel. 

Michigan DUI Laws

Michigan DUI Laws

Receiving a DUI in Michigan carries strict penalties and fees that can cost a driver high sums of money and their driving privileges. Also referred to as an OWI, operating while intoxicated, Michigan DUI laws mirror a few other states in this regard. In addition, Michigan law on DUI cite an additional charge for what they refer to as OWVI, or operating while visually impaired. 

This charge is levied if a driver has any combination of drugs or alcohol in their system that inhibit their ability to see, and as such, operate a motor vehicle. A driver can be charged with the OWVI if a test is taken resulting in any amount of a schedule one drug in their system. If a driver under the age of 21, or one with a commercial license, receives a DUI in Michigan, the permitted .08 is lowered to .02 and .04 respectively. 

First Offense:

A first offense for a DUI in Michigan, although less strict than some states, carries strict penalties that can include; jail of up to ninety-three days, fines from one-hundred to five-hundred dollars in addition to a yearly one-thousand dollar fine for two years, a suspended license for up to six months (with an eligibility for restricted driving privileges after 30 days), and six points on the driver's license. Michigan DUI laws also allow for the possibility of community service up to 350 hours, the installment of an ignition interlock device, or even total vehicle immobilization.

Second Offense:

Receiving a second DUI in Michigan can correlate to jail-time for five days up to one year, a suspended license for one year, six points on a driver's license, removal of license plates and vehicle immobilization for three to six months, an ignition interlock device, and fines from two-hundred to one-thousand dollars in addition to the yearly one-thousand dollar fee for two years. Michigan DUI laws also stipulate a possibility of community service for one to three months. 

Third Offense:

Being charged with a third DUI in Michigan is a felony, carrying with it probation with one to twelve months in jail, one to five years imprisonment, driver's license revocation for a minimum one year, the confiscation of license plates with the vehicle immobilized for three to six months, fines of two-hundred to one-thousand dollars in addition to the yearly one-thousand dollars for two years, and possible community service for two to six months. 

Wyoming DUI Laws

Wyoming DUI Laws

Wyoming DUI laws require that any individual who is charged with a Wyoming DUI, has to pay for their own substance abuse assessment before their license can be reinstated. This rule applies no matter how many times an individual is convicted of a Wyoming DUI.
 
When one is charged with their first Wyoming DUI, they will lose their license for at least 90 days. A six month jail term is also possible under Wyoming DUI laws, depending on the severity of the incident. A minimum fine of $750 has to be paid to the state as well. The penalties for Wyoming DUI charges increase depending on how much time passes between each one.
The second Wyoming DUI that one is charged with carries a jail sentence of at least seven days. That term can be extended to last up to six months. Wyoming DUI laws require that an individual meet with a substance abuse counselor that is certified by the department of health before being sentenced in court. 
The person must pay for this assessment on their own. Failure to do so will result in a stricter sentence as well as the inability to have one’s license reinstated. The individual who is charged with a second Wyoming DUI will have their license suspended for at least one year and pay a fine of at least $750. New Wyoming DUI laws passed in 2009 make it mandatory for anyone convicted of a second Wyoming DUI to pay for an install an ignition interlock device for one year in the car they use.
A third Wyoming DUI conviction will result in one losing their license for at least three years. Under Wyoming DUI laws, there is a 30 day mandatory jail sentence that one must complete if they are convicted of a third Wyoming DUI. This can be extended for up to six months but can be lessened if the individual attends an inpatient rehabilitation center to receive drug or alcohol addiction treatment. An ignition interlock device must be installed in the individual’s car for two years after their license is reinstated. Fines range from $750 to $3000.
A fourth Wyoming DUI charge results in a fine of up to $10,000. If the fourth Wyoming DUI is within five years of a previous Wyoming DUI conviction, an individual may be sentenced for up to two years in jail. A fourth Wyoming DUI charge requires an individual to use an ignition interlock device for the duration of their life. After five years, a driver can petition the courts with a request to remove the ignition interlock device.
Under Wyoming DUI laws, any individual who drives in Wyoming gives permission for the police department to administer a drug or breathalyzer test if it is suspected that they are impaired. A person who refuses such a test automatically loses their license for six months for the first Wyoming DUI conviction and 18 months for everyone after that.