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Pennsylvania DUI Laws

Pennsylvania DUI Laws

 
 
Guide to Pennsylvania DUI Laws
 
 
Unlike many states, which have a single BAC cutoff level for drunk driving offenses, PA DUI laws recognize three tiers of drunk drivers.  Understanding Pennsylvania DUI laws can help you to explore your legal options if you have been accused of a drunk driving offense.  This guide will explain the tiered system of PA DUI laws, as well as the penalties for being caught driving drunk at each of the tiers.
 
 
BAC Levels
 
 
The three tiers of drunk driving recognized by Pennsylvania DUI laws depend on blood alcohol content (BAC).  If you are caught driving drunk with a BAC between .08 and .099, you will receive general impairment penalties.  Drivers caught with a BAC between .10 and .159 will receive “High BAC” penalties, while drivers testing at .16 or higher will receive “Highest BAC” penalties.
 
 
Penalties
 
 
The penalties for violating PA DUI laws depend on which tier you fall into.  While BAC determines the tier for most people, commercial drivers and minors who are caught driving drunk will find themselves in the “High BAC” penalty tier rather than the “general impairment” tier.  In general, you can expect the following penalties for a violation of Pennsylvania DUI laws in each tier:
 
 
In the general impairment penalties tier, your drunk driving offense will be considered a misdemeanor, punishable by up to 6 months of probation.  You will be required to go to traffic school and pay a $300 fine, and PA DUI laws allow the court to require alcohol counseling and treatment.
 
 
If you are tested in the high BAC range, you will owe a fine of $500 to $5000, and will see your driver's license suspended for 12 months the first time you violate Pennsylvania DUI laws.  You will also have to attend traffic safety school and alcohol counseling and treatment.  PA DUI laws also mandate that offenders in the high BAC range be incarcerated for 48 hours to 6 months.
 
 
Drivers who are convicted of violating Pennsylvania DUI laws with a BAC of .16 or higher can expect a 12 month license suspension, 3 days to 6 months of incarceration, traffic school, alcohol treatment, and a $1000 to $5000 fine.
 
 
Refusal to Test
 
 
People who refuse to submit to testing for alcohol or controlled substances may be subjected to penalties for the highest BAC level.  PA DUI laws recognize the notion of implied consent to drug testing, and if you refuse to test, your license will be suspended for 12 to 18 months.  The officer arresting you is required to notify you of the potential penalties for refusing to submit to a chemical test of breath, urine, or blood.
 
 
Plea Bargaining
 
 
Some states allow defendants charged with DUI law violations to plead guilty to a lesser offense to avoid a drunk driving conviction.  Pennsylvania DUI laws explicitly forbid this kind of plea bargaining.  If you have been convicted of a violation of PA DUI laws, it will be on your record for ten years as an aggravating factor if you subsequently are convicted again of a DUI.
 
 

Puerto Rico Traffic Fines

Puerto Rico Traffic Fines

 
 
Guide to Puerto Rico Traffic Fines
 
 
While in most states, traffic fines are set by municipal authorities and can vary significantly depending on jurisdiction, PR traffic fines are set by the territory.  Understanding Puerto Rico traffic fines can help you avoid a costly ticket.  This guide will explain some of the PR traffic fines that can be expected for both non-moving and moving violations.  If you want to fight your Puerto Rico traffic fines or learn more information about territorial traffic laws, you may want to consult with a defense lawyer.
 
 
Puerto Rico Traffic Fines for Parking Violations
 
 
While the largest PR traffic fines are reserved for moving violations, parking infractions can also result in substantial penalties.  Parking on a pedestrian walkway or in a loading/unloading zone will lead to Puerto Rico traffic fines of $25, while parking in front of a fire hydrant, fire station, bus stop, or on a curb will net a $50 fine.
 
 
The steepest PR traffic fines for non-moving violations are reserved for those who pretend to be having an emergency while parking (for instance, to get out of another traffic fine).  Lying about an emergency in order to park somewhere can net you Puerto Rico traffic fines of up to $100.
 
 
Puerto Rico Traffic Fines for Speeding
 
 
It is fairly easy to compute the PR traffic fines that you will be charged if you're caught speeding.  The speeding ticket itself is a baseline of $50, and $5 is added to your Puerto Rico traffic fines for every mile per hour you drove in excess of the posted speed limit.  In some circumstances, these PR traffic fines can be even higher.  For example, speeding in a school zone is punishable by $250 Puerto Rico traffic fines, and drivers who go 100 mph or more are considered reckless and will be assessed with a $500 fine.
 
 
Puerto Rico Traffic Fines for DUI
 
 
Drunk driving is a serious criminal offense, and you can expect some heavy PR traffic fines if you are charged with a DUI.  The first time that you are convicted of driving under the influence, you will be liable for paying $300-500 in Puerto Rico traffic fines.  Additionally, you can expect your license to be suspended for a minimum of 30 days.  Second DUI offenses require you to pay even higher PR traffic fines of $500-700, and additional offenses will be charged a $700-1000 fine.  Second and third-time DUI offenders can also expect jail time as a penalty for their drunk driving.
 
 
If you cause an accident that hurts someone while driving under the influence, you may not only be assessed Puerto Rico traffic fines in the amount of $1000-5000, you may also be charged with a felony and be required to serve up to 3 years in prison.
 
 
Other Puerto Rico Traffic Fines
 
Driving without a license will net traffic fines of $100 in Puerto Rico, as will letting someone drive your vehicle who is not licensed.  Just leaving your license at home could be a $25 fine if you're pulled over, and driving with an expired license will cost $50.
 

Puerto Rico DUI Laws

Puerto Rico DUI Laws

 
 
Guide to Puerto Rico DUI Laws
 
 
Driving under the influence is a serious criminal charge in any United States jurisdiction, and Puerto Rico is no exception.  Drivers who violate PR DUI laws may find themselves subjected to misdemeanor or even felony penalties.  If you are involved in an accident while driving drunk, Puerto Rico DUI laws are particularly harsh.  This guide will give you an overview of PR DUI laws, but if you need legal advice about your specific situation you are advised to talk to a criminal defense attorney familiar with DUI cases.
 
 
BAC Guidelines
 
 
In order to be considered intoxicated, a breath analysis will need to indicate that your blood alcohol content (BAC) is greater than .08%.  This means that Puerto Rico DUI laws take effect when you have had even just a few drinks.  For underage drinkers, the limit is substantially lower: PR DUI laws consider a driver 18-20 years old to be driving drunk with any BAC over .02%.  This means that if you are too young to drink, you may be arrested according to Puerto Rico DUI laws even if you've only had one drink.
 
 
Penalties for First-Time DUI Offenders
 
 
A first time DUI offense is considered a misdemeanor according to PR DUI laws.  First time offenders can expect to pay a fine of up to $500.  All drivers convicted of a first-time violation of Puerto Rico DUI laws will have their license suspended for up to six months.  In some cases, the court may require that you have an ignition interlock installed in your vehicle if you violate PR DUI laws.  This interlock device will only permit you to turn your vehicle on if you can blow a clean breath test.
 
 
Penalties for Second-Time DUI Offenders
 
 
Penalties get much stiffer for repeat violators of Puerto Rico DUI laws.  If you violate PR DUI laws for a second time, not only will you face fines of up to $700 and a license suspension of up to a year, you'll also be put in jail for at least five days.  You may also be required to perform community service for up to 30 days.  Ignition interlock devices are even more commonly ordered by the court when an offender has committed repeated violations of Puerto Rico DUI laws.
 
 
Penalties for Third-Time DUI Offenders
 
 
While both first and second time DUI offenses are considered misdemeanors, drivers who are committing their third or subsequent violation of PR DUI laws are charged with felonies.  You will spend at least 10 days in jail for your third DUI offense and may spend up to a year there.  Your license will also be suspended for at least a year and you may owe a fine of up to $1000.
 
 
Penalties for Causing an Accident
 
 
Accidents caused by violations of Puerto Rico DUI laws will cause you to be charged with a felony.  You can expect to pay fines of $1000-5000 if you are convicted of causing an accident while drunk, and may spend over a year in prison.
 
 

California DUI Laws

California DUI Laws

 
Quick Guide to California DUI Laws 
 
 
California DUI Laws
 
 
California DUI laws carry strict penalties and fines, and anyone suspected of a DUI should contact a lawyer immediately.  California DUI law has changed in 2012, and penalties are even stricter in order to try and stop repeat offenders.  
 
 
Under the California DUI law, a repeat offender who has three convictions in 10 years can lose their license for at least 10 years.  This article will cover other California DUI laws, penalties and fines, and penalties associated with refusing and BAC test.  
 
 
California DUI Law
 
 
Vehicle Code Section 23152 Driving Under Influence of Alcohol or Drugs covers general laws associated with drinking and driving.  Sections under this law are paraphrased below: 
 
 
(a) Any person who is under the influence of alcohol or drugs—or under the influence of combined substances—cannot operate a vehicle.  
 
 
(b) Anyone with a blood alcohol level of 0.08% or more cannot operate a vehicle, whether motorized or non-motorized.  
 
 
(c) It is illegal for anyone with a known addiction to any drug to operate a vehicle, but this law does not apply to people in a narcotic treatment program under Article 3 of Chapter 1 of Part 3 of Division 10.5 of CA Health and Safety Code.  
 
 
(d) It is illegal for anyone to operate a commercial motor vehicle with a blood alcohol level of 0.04% or more.  
 
 
There are other California DUI laws, and these laws can be found under the California Department of Motor Vehicles.  
 
 
Penalties for DUI in California
 
 
California DUI law does not set a final amount for penalties and fines, but instead, local divisions determine the final amount.  Many fines and penalties are similar throughout the state, and many bay area counties and northern California communities issue the following fines and penalties when a California DUI law is violated: 
 
 
First Offense
 
 
Probation: three to five years
 
 
Fines: Fines and court costs between $1,400 and $1,800
 
 
Driver License Suspension: loss of license for 6 months
 
 
DUI School: 12 to 45 hours
 
 
Jail Time: 48 hours
 
 
Second Offense
 
 
Probation: three to five years
 
 
Fines: $1,800 to $2,800
 
 
Driver License Suspension: loss of license for two years
 
 
DUI School: 18 months
 
 
Jail Time: 10 to 30 days
 
 
Third Offense
 
 
Probation: three to five years
 
 
Fines: $1,800
 
 
Driver License Suspension: between 3 to 10 years
 
 
DUI School: 18 months
 
 
Jail Time: 120 to 210 days 
 
 
California DUI Laws and Refusing Chemical Test
 
 
Under California DUI law, a driver will usually receive the maximum penalty if they refuse a blood test or breathalyzer.  California DUI laws allow a person to dispute this issue in court, but a judge will likely stick strictly to the California DUI law if a person refuses a chemical test.  The following penalties may issued if you refuse a chemical test: 
 
 
loss of license for one year for first offense
 
 
loss of license for two years if repeated in 10 years
 
 
loss of license for at least three years if third offense in 10 years
 
 

Ohio DUI Laws

Ohio DUI Laws

 
 
Quick Guide to Ohio DUI Laws 
 
 
Ohio DUI Law
 
 
Ohio DUI laws carry strict penalties and fines that cannot only affect your finances, but your family and employment as well.  In Ohio, DUI laws are referred to as are referred to as OVI laws, or operating a vehicle under the influence.  For the sake of convenience, this article will still refer to laws and penalties as DUIs.  
 
 
Specific DUI Laws
 
 
Code 4511.19 Operating vehicle under the influence of alcohol or drugs—OVI refers to general but specific Ohio DUI law.  If you have violated a law in this section, you may be entitled to fines, jail time, probation, suspension of your license, and more.  The Ohio DUI laws state that a driver cannot operate vehicle in any of the following circumstances:  
 
 
(a) the person is under the influence or combined influence of alcohol or drugs
 
 
(b) the person has a concentration of .08 percent of alcohol in their blood
 
 
(i) the person has a concentration of 500 nanograms of amphetamine per milliliter of urine
 
 
(v) the person has 10 nanograms of heroin in one milliliter of urine
 
 
(vi) the person has at least 25 nanograms of L.S.D. per milliliter of urine
 
 
(vii) the person has a concentration of at least 10 nanograms of marijuana per milliliter of urine 
 
 
There are number other Ohio DUI laws that apply, and you can view these laws by accessing the following link
 
 
Penalties for DUI in Ohio
 
 
Ohio DUI law specifies different penalties for different numbers offenses.  Fines may vary from area to area according to local ordinances, but many of the fines listed below are fairly common within Ohio DUI law: 
 
 
First Offense
 
 
Jail time- 3 days minimum, 6 days if BAC was .17 or above
 
Driver intervention program- 3 days
 
License suspension- six months to three years
 
Reinstatement Fee- $450
 
Fine- From $250 to $1,000
 
 
Second Offense
 
 
Jail time- 10 days minimum, 20 days if BAC was .17% or above
 
Electronic Home Monitoring- from 18 days to 6 months
 
License suspension- from 1 to 5 years
 
Vehicle Immobilization- 90 days
 
Reinstatement Fee- $450
 
Fine- from $350 to $1,500
 
 
Third Offense
 
 
Jail time- 30 days to 1 year depending on BAC level
 
Home Monitoring- from 55 days to 1 year
 
License suspension- From one to 10 years
 
Vehicle Immobilization- 180 days 
 
Reinstatement Fee- $450
 
Fine- from $350 to $1,500
 
 
Ohio DUI law is always changing, so these limits may increase from year to year.  
 
 
What happens if I refuse a chemical test?
 
 
According to Ohio DUI laws, you will receive the maximum sentence in most cases if you refuse a chemical test, but you may not lose your license for as long.  Ohio DUI law allows an attorney to reach a plea bargain in some cases, but refusing a chemical test will hurt your chances.  
 
 
According to Ohio DUI laws, you will lose your license for one year for the first offense, two years for the second offense, and three years for the third offense.  
 
 

Michigan DUI Laws

Michigan DUI Laws

 
 
Quick Guide to Michigan DUI Laws and Penalties 
 
 
Michigan DUI Law
 
 
Michigan DUI laws are somewhat relaxed compared to other states, but these penalties and fines are still serious and cause significant problems in your family and job.  This article will discuss specific Michigan DUI laws listed in the state statutes, as well as an overview of penalties and fines in the state.  
 
 
Specific Michigan DUI Laws
 
 
Section 257.625 of the state statutes refers to the majority of Michigan DUI law under the state’s vehicle code.  Some of the sections of this Michigan DUI law are provided below: 
 
 
A person, who is licensed or not, cannot operate a vehicle on a public highway or any other public location, including parking lots, if they are intoxicated.  Being “intoxicated” is defined below: 
 
 
(a) The person is under the influence of alcoholic liquor, a controlled substance, or a combination of both.  
 
 
(b) The person has an alcohol content of 0.08 grams per 100 milliliters of blood, per 210 liters of breath, or per 67 milliliters of urine, or, beginning on October 1, 2013, a content of 0.10 grams per 100 milliliters of blood, per 210 liters of breath, or 67 milliliters of urine.  
 
 
There are many other Michigan DUI laws you’ll want to refer to, and these laws are located under the following link
 
 
Penalties for DUI in Michigan
 
 
Michigan DUI law provides different penalties for varying amounts of offenses.  You have the right to contest the fines and penalties listed below, and if you take such action, you should hire an attorney that specializes in Michigan DUI law.  
 
 
First Offense
 
Jail time- Up to 93 days depending on level of intoxication 
 
Community Service- up to 15 days, or 360 hours
 
License suspension- may receive restricted license after 30 days
 
Driver Responsibility Fee- $1,000 for two years
 
License Points- 6 points
 
Fine- From $100 to $500
 
 
Second Offense
 
Jail time- 5 days to 1 year depending on level of intoxication 
 
Community Service- 30 to 90 days
 
License suspension- minimum suspension of one year
 
Driver Responsibility Fee- $1,000 for two years
 
License Points- 6 points
 
IID- mandatory ignition interlock device
 
Fine- From $200 to $1,000
 
 
Third Offense
 
Jail time- 1 to 5 years
 
Probation- 30 days to 1 year 
 
Community Service- 60 to 180 days
 
License suspension- minimum of one year
 
Driver Responsibility Fee- $1,000 for two years
 
License Points- 6 points
 
IID- mandatory ignition interlock device
 
Fine- From $200 to $1,000
 
Vehicle Immobilization- from 90 days to 180 days
 
 
What happens if I refuse a chemical test?
 
 
According to Michigan DUI laws, you will receive the maximum sentence in most cases if you refuse a chemical test, but you may not lose your license for as long.  Michigan DUI law allows an attorney to reach a plea bargain in some cases, but refusing a chemical test will hurt your chances.  
 
 
According to Ohio DUI laws, you will lose your license for one year for the first offense, and two years for the second and third offense.  
 
 

Colorado Traffic Fines

Colorado Traffic Fines

Guide to Colorado Traffic Fines
 
 
No one wants to see flashing red lights pulling them over—and the ticket afterward is even worse.  If you drive on Colorado's roads, you may want to know what Colorado traffic fines you might be subject to for breaking some common rules of the road.  This guide can help you to understand the usual ranges of Colorado traffic fines and let you know what to expect from traffic tickets in Colorado.
 
 
Please remember that this guide is simply to be used to tell you averages and maximum fine amounts, rather than telling you a specific fine amount in your case.  Repeat or habitual offenders, as well as people who have caused an accident with a traffic offense, may be subject to significantly higher Colorado traffic fines, as well as possible license suspensions.
 
 
Civil Infraction Or Misdemeanor?
 
 
Most Colorado traffic fines and tickets are issued for civil infractions, which are not punished in a criminal court.  Civil infractions carry no possibility of jail time (and you aren't entitled to a public defender to help you defend against them).  Civil infractions are still violations of the law, though, and you can have your license suspended even if you have only received a ticket for a civil infraction.
 
 
Misdemeanors are significantly more serious than civil infractions, mostly because they also carry the possibility of jail time.  It is more common for repeat offenders to be charged with a misdemeanor instead of a civil infraction for a traffic offense.  You may also be charged with a misdemeanor for driving on a suspended license or DUI/DWI.  The Colorado traffic fines for misdemeanors are significantly higher than for civil infractions.
 
 
Speeding Tickets
 
 
In the state of Colorado, your speeding ticket can be as little as $15 but as much as $100 for a first-time offense.  If you are charged with speeding in a construction work zone, your fines will be doubled.  Generally, how much your speeding ticket costs will depend on two things: where you were charged and how much you were exceeding posted speed limits by.
 
 
If you exceeded posted speed limits by more than 25 miles per hour, you will be considered a reckless driver and can be charged with a misdemeanor.  You will be subject to fines up to $300 and you may go to jail for 10-90 days.
 
 
Running Red Lights/Stop Signs
 
 
While Colorado traffic fines for running a red light or stop sign are not very high (expect around $80-120 depending on municipality), the points on your license can be very serious.  You will have four points assessed, and if you already had 8 or more points on your record, you will now have 12 points or more and be subject to automatic license suspension.
 
 
Because license points stay on your license in Colorado for a full seven years, it is important to remember that the Colorado traffic fines are not the only punishment when you run a red light or a stop sign.  Having your license suspended can be costly and embarrassing, so avoiding additional license points is important, especially if you already have been ticketed several times in recent years.
 
 

Iowa Traffic Fines

Iowa Traffic Fines

Guide to Iowa Traffic Fines
 
 
Getting caught violating Iowa traffic laws can result in penalties that affect you for years to come.  In this guide, you will learn what kind of Iowa traffic fines are associated with various traffic offenses.  When goint through this guide, it is important to remember that it is much easier to predict fines for first-time offenders.  Repeat offenders are often subject to significantly higher Iowa traffic fines at a judge's discretion, and may face additional consequences.
 
 
This guide will give you a good set of guidelines to help you estimate your Iowa traffic fines, but only your local courthouse can tell you exactly how much your ticket is going to be.  Calling an Iowa traffic lawyer or the traffic court phone number on your citation may help you to find out the accurate details of your traffic fines.
 
 
Civil Infraction or Misdemeanor?
 
 
The consequences you will face as a result of your traffic offense depend on whether you are cited for a civil infraction or if you are charged with a misdemeanor.  This is an important distinction, because while both civil infractions and misdemeanors are punishable by Iowa traffic fines and license suspensions, only misdemeanors may be punishable by time in jail.
 
 
Most of the time, simple traffic offenses will just be civil infractions and carry no risk of jail time.  However, more serious offenses, like DUI, will be charged as misdemeanors, as will some repeat traffic offenses.  You may also be charged with a misdemeanor if your traffic offense endangered people around you.
 
 
Speeding Tickets
 
 
Speeding tickets can be issued either as civil infractions or misdemeanors.  If you are charged with a misdemeanor, you may have to go to jail for up to 30 days (this would be highly atypical for a first-time offender—realistically, if it's your first time in court, you will probably only need to pay Iowa traffic fines).
 
 
Typically, your fine will range from $50 to $100, depending on how fast you were going.  This is lower than the average fine in the United States for first-time speeders.  If you were going more than 25 mph over the posted speed limit, you may also have your license suspended for up to a year at the judge's discretion.  Your fine will be doubled if you were speeding in a work zone, even if construction workers were not present at the time.
 
 
Texting While Driving
 
 
In Iowa, it has been illegal to exchange text messages while driving since July of 2010.  For adults, texting while driving is a secondary offense (you cannot be stopped just for texting), but for children under 18, it is a primary offense and you can be stopped for texting even if you are doing nothing else wrong.
 
 
Iowa traffic fines for texting while driving are only $30 for a first-time offense, but remember: texting while driving is dangerous.  If you are convicted of causing an accident due to texting while driving, you will face Iowa traffic fines of up to $1000.
 
 

Oklahoma Traffic Fines

Oklahoma Traffic Fines

 
A Brief Guide to Oklahoma Traffic Fines
 
 
Oklahoma traffic fines can be serve enough that they put your financial situation in jeopardy. Perhaps because of this,  many residents choose to fight the Oklahoma traffic fines inflicted upon them, going to court to deny culpability for an accident or traffic violation. Before you decide what to do, you should understand the full extent of the Oklahoma traffic fines you are facing in order to make a completely informed choice.
 
 
A Summary of Oklahoma Traffic Fines
 
 
As with most states, Oklahoma traffic fines are not equal across the state but rather they vary from local district to local district since they are set by local ordinances. In order to know you own, you need to contact your city court and ask what your Oklahoma traffic fine will be. However, in preparation of that, you can look at this list of Oklahoma traffic fines from the Oklahoma City municipal court, which is likely similar to the schedule of fines in your district.
 
 
Speeding up to 10 mph over limit: $161.00
 
 
Speeding 11-19 mph over limit: $192.00
 
 
Speeding 20 mph over limit: $202.00
 
 
Speeding in a school zone: $202.00
 
 
Failure to yield right of way: $182.00
 
 
Failure to yield right of way to emergency vehicle: $202.00
 
 
Improper lane change: $172.00
 
 
Ignoring a signal light: $172.00
 
 
Failure to stop at stop sign: $172.00
 
 
Improper turning of any type: $172.00
 
 
The Disciplinary Point System
 
 
For most drivers inflicted with them, the problems only begin with Oklahoma traffic fines. That’s because each Oklahoma traffic fine comes with a disciplinary point value associated with it that signals to insurance companies that an individual has committed a moving violation. These individuals are charged more for their insurance since they are more likely to get into an accident, and so the disciplinary point system acts as a way of giving out hidden Oklahoma traffic fines.
 
 
In addition, points should be avoided because individuals who get too many put their license in danger. All it takes is 10 points during 5 years to get a license suspension, and that’s only 2 points per year. The good news is that 2 points are removed from your record for each 12 month period spent without accumulating a new ticket.
 
 
Here is a list of the points given for several different types of moving violations:
 
 
Failure to stop for a school bus that is unloading—4 points
 
 
Reckless driving—4 points
 
 
Speeding in excess of 25 miles per hour over the posted limit—3 points
 
 
Failure to yield right-of-way—2 points
 
 
Careless driving—2 points
 
 
Speeding less than 25 miles per hour over the posed limit—2 points
 
 
Driving while a license is suspended—2 points
 
 
Driving the wrong way on a one-way street—2 points
 
 
Ignoring and passing a stop sign—2 points
 
 
Ignoring and passing a traffic light—2 points
 
 
Operating a defective vehicle—1 point
 

Pennsylvania Traffic Fines

Pennsylvania Traffic Fines

 
A Brief Introduction to Pennsylvania Traffic Fines
 
 
Pennsylvania traffic fines are confusing, but for individuals who don’t suitably research them, they may appear scarer or more threatening than they actually are. It can be very easy to manage your Pennsylvania traffic fine, but remember that you still have the option available to fight it in open court. The costs associated with doing so, from court fees to what an optional defense lawyer would charge, may be much greater than your actual Pennsylvania traffic fine, so please research as much as possible before deciding your plan of action.
 
 
A Summary of Pennsylvania Traffic Fines
 
 
A Pennsylvania traffic fine for speeding is no simple matter to compute. In fact, there are multiple different charges which compose such a Pennsylvania traffic fine, including administrative fees, Emergency Service Fund payments, a fee to pay for the upgrading of the judicial computer system, a surcharge on the Catastrophic Loss Trust Fund, and then the actual Pennsylvania traffic fine, which is composed of both a base fine and then an extra amount charged for each mile over the speed limit an individual went.
 
 
Here is some information on all types of Pennsylvania traffic fines that should be able to help you calculate your own fine for speeding or whatever violation you are being charged with:
 
 
Speeding in a 65 mile per hour zone: $137 plus $2 for every mile per hour over five miles per hour over the speed limit that was driven
 
 
Speeding in any zone not listed as being 65 miles per hour: $126 plus $2 for every mile per hour above five miles per hour above the speed limit that was driven.
 
 
Driving too fast considering the hazardous conditions: $109.50
 
 
Driving too slowly: $109.50
 
 
Ignoring or passing traffic-control devices such as a stop sign or stop light: $109.50
 
 
The Disciplinary Point System
 
 
There is also a point system in place in the state of Pennsylvania that can make assessing your Pennsylvania traffic fines all the more difficult. That is because points work as indirect Pennsylvania traffic fines in that they tip car insurance companies that a driver is at-risk for an accident and should therefore be charged higher insurance premiums. 
 
 
One of the ostensible reasons for the point system is that it prevents such risky drivers from getting behind the wheel. All drivers who accumulate six points need to take an examination about proper driving etiquette and safety. If they pass, two points will be removed from their record. If you pass six points a second time, you’ll have to pass a on-the-road driving examination to still have control of your license and drop two points again. The third time you accumulate 6 points, an immediate suspension will be placed on your ability to drive. Drivers under 18 will get suspensions the first time they cross the 6 point limit.
 
 
Here are a few important examples of Pennsylvania traffic fines as points with their relevant accidents:
 
 
Not stopping for a red light or a traffic signal: 3 points
 
 
Careless driving: 3 points
 
 
Not stopping for a school bus with flashing red lights: 4 points and a 60 day suspension
 
 
pennsylvania traffic fines Various traffic violation and its fine in the state of pennsylvania
 
 
Speeding by six to 10 mph: 2 points
 
 
Speeding by 11 to 15 mph: 3 points
 
 
Speeding by 16 to 25 mph: 4 points
 
 
Speeding by 26 to 30 mph: 5 points
 
 
Speeding more than 30 mph: 5 points